The Ultimate Guide to Yogurt: What’s in It, Why It’s Good for You, Recipes, and More – Everyday Health

Because yogurt is so high in protein, it can support muscle strength and bone health, says Brittany Modell, RD, the owner of Brittany Modell Nutrition and Wellness in New York City. “Protein is the building block of muscles, bones, cartilage, skin, and blood,” she says, adding that it also helps you feel fuller for longer.

Yogurt can also help you meet your calcium needs for a day, says Nelson.

“Calcium is essential for vascular contraction, muscle function, nerve transmission, and cellular signaling,” adds Modell. “It’s also very important for bone health.”

Some brands of yogurt are fortified with vitamin D, a nutrient essential to skeletal development and the regulation of calcium and phosphorus, or other vitamins and minerals.

Last, but certainly not least, yogurt is beloved for its probiotic properties, which are a by-product of fermentation. When “starter” bacteria is added to milk to create it, those that survive digestion (and sometimes, those that are added post-pasteurization) are believed to boost digestive health by restoring the gut microbiome with the “good bacteria” it needs.

Think of probiotics as little Pac-Men sent to your gut to break down and “eat” bad bacteria while helping you break down and digest food, suggests Nelson. In addition to keeping your gastrointestinal system working properly, a varied and balanced assortment of these healthy bacteria appear to have wide-ranging effects on many aspects of health, from immunity to skin conditions.

“Probiotics have been shown to clear infections from the gut, resolve imbalances, have anti-inflammatory properties, and promote a healthy immune system,” says Angie Asche, RD, a nutritionist at Centr.

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The Ultimate Guide to Yogurt: What’s in It, Why It’s Good for You, Recipes, and More – Everyday Health

Because yogurt is so high in protein, it can support muscle strength and bone health, says Brittany Modell, RD, the owner of Brittany Modell Nutrition and Wellness in New York City. “Protein is the building block of muscles, bones, cartilage, skin, and blood,” she says, adding that it also helps you feel fuller for longer.

Yogurt can also help you meet your calcium needs for a day, says Nelson.

“Calcium is essential for vascular contraction, muscle function, nerve transmission, and cellular signaling,” adds Modell. “It’s also very important for bone health.”

Some brands of yogurt are fortified with vitamin D, a nutrient essential to skeletal development and the regulation of calcium and phosphorus, or other vitamins and minerals.

Last, but certainly not least, yogurt is beloved for its probiotic properties, which are a by-product of fermentation. When “starter” bacteria is added to milk to create it, those that survive digestion (and sometimes, those that are added post-pasteurization) are believed to boost digestive health by restoring the gut microbiome with the “good bacteria” it needs.

Think of probiotics as little Pac-Men sent to your gut to break down and “eat” bad bacteria while helping you break down and digest food, suggests Nelson. In addition to keeping your gastrointestinal system working properly, a varied and balanced assortment of these healthy bacteria appear to have wide-ranging effects on many aspects of health, from immunity to skin conditions.

“Probiotics have been shown to clear infections from the gut, resolve imbalances, have anti-inflammatory properties, and promote a healthy immune system,” says Angie Asche, RD, a nutritionist at Centr.

Spread the love

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.