Efficacy, education, investigation: three takeaways from anti-aging self-esteem study – CosmeticsDesign.com USA

Anti-aging products are estimated to be a $60 billion market, and Precedence Research estimates​ it will double by 2030. 

Evangelista et al published an article in Cosmetics studying the relationship between the use of anti-aging products and self-esteem in a sample group of Portuguese women.

“The relationship between usage patterns of anti-aging cosmetic products and women’s self-esteem has been seldom described in the literature,”​ Evangelista et al said. “This study aims to fill this knowledge gap.”

Research results

The study found that the link between aging, physical appearance, mental health and other life elements were closely correlated with self-esteem. Evangelista et al found factors like age, marital status, professional status and household income strongly impacted self-esteem.

In direct relation to personal care, the study found a negative correlation between self-esteem and “body shape, body size, weight, clothing, concern about hairs, looks, and self-perception about body image and this standard of beauty set by our (western) society.” 

Evangelista et al cited a study that found 89% of Australian women reported having canceled meetings with friends, special events and job interviews because they didn’t feel they looked good.

The study also discussed research finding that women experiencing depression and anxiety may have lower self-esteem. Anxiety and depression may make one feel they cannot face challenges, like physical signs of aging.

“Women with high self-esteem engage in beauty care … while others may deny the process and not take care of themselves, isolate themselves from the social environment, and show disappointment with their physical appearance, which may relate to low self-esteem, which increases depressive and anxiety symptoms,”​ Evangelista et al said.

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Efficacy, education, investigation: three takeaways from anti-aging self-esteem study – CosmeticsDesign.com USA

Anti-aging products are estimated to be a $60 billion market, and Precedence Research estimates​ it will double by 2030. 

Evangelista et al published an article in Cosmetics studying the relationship between the use of anti-aging products and self-esteem in a sample group of Portuguese women.

“The relationship between usage patterns of anti-aging cosmetic products and women’s self-esteem has been seldom described in the literature,”​ Evangelista et al said. “This study aims to fill this knowledge gap.”

Research results

The study found that the link between aging, physical appearance, mental health and other life elements were closely correlated with self-esteem. Evangelista et al found factors like age, marital status, professional status and household income strongly impacted self-esteem.

In direct relation to personal care, the study found a negative correlation between self-esteem and “body shape, body size, weight, clothing, concern about hairs, looks, and self-perception about body image and this standard of beauty set by our (western) society.” 

Evangelista et al cited a study that found 89% of Australian women reported having canceled meetings with friends, special events and job interviews because they didn’t feel they looked good.

The study also discussed research finding that women experiencing depression and anxiety may have lower self-esteem. Anxiety and depression may make one feel they cannot face challenges, like physical signs of aging.

“Women with high self-esteem engage in beauty care … while others may deny the process and not take care of themselves, isolate themselves from the social environment, and show disappointment with their physical appearance, which may relate to low self-esteem, which increases depressive and anxiety symptoms,”​ Evangelista et al said.

Spread the love

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.