Are there enough remote jobs for everyone who wants one? – BBC

In the US, postings that explicitly mention remote work between January 2020 and March 2022 are up 319%, yet searches are up 458%. In the UK, remote-job postings have increased a similar 329%, while the number of searches has skyrocketed 790%. This mismatched pattern also holds in countries such as Italy, Germany and France, where remote-job postings have declined (or are generally less available) since their pandemic peak. 

Across the world, demand has been outstripping supply in many cases – and, according to Adrjan, people are still very actively searching for at least partially remote roles, even as the pandemic wanes in some economies. He says the supply of these jobs is getting even tighter in countries with weaker broadband infrastructures, like Italy, and in those where cultural acceptance of remote working isn’t as high, like France and Japan. In these economies, the share of remote postings is dropping, as employers begin transitioning newly open roles back to the office.

Similarly, LinkedIn’s data on remote jobs – positions explicitly labelled as remote, or ones that contain related keywords, such as ‘work from home’, including hybrid roles – showed a dramatic increase in the number of applications. In March 2020 at the beginning of the pandemic, paid remote jobs attracted 1.8 times more applications than paid non-remote jobs; in March 2022, this figure was higher at 2.6 times. Even as the number of remote roles increased, they couldn’t keep pace with the number of applicants for these jobs.

“The key takeaway here is that the supply of, and employees’ demand for, remote jobs have both grown rapidly over the past two years, but demand has grown faster,” says Mary Kate Fields, data communications manager at LinkedIn.

Spread the love

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.